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Mighty Machine

Behold the 2020 Sarolea X N60 MM.01…

Another month, another electric motorcycle, and this time, the team at Mighty Machines have built a two wheeler that looks like it belongs to an evil James Bond clone from the future.
Known as the Sarolea X N60 Mighty Machines MM.01, it was developed on the base of Sarolea’s Isle of Man TT racer, meaning not only is it auto eye candy — but it is well capable of munching asphalt at scary speeds.
Because the N60 is a cafe-style biker built on the same platform as the Man superbike, it comes equipped with an air-cooled brushless DC motor rated at 120kW — which translates to 163 horses on steroids. Naturally with those figures you get an instant power delivery that will find you at the 100 km/h point in three seconds.
Of course, this stealth cycle needs a power supply, and it comes in the form of a super-quick-charging 22 kWh lithium-ion battery. You can juice up to 80% in just 20 minutes and cover 330km before needing another zap. All tech and wizardry onboard is taken care of by WAIZU AI: an artificial intelligence automotive platform created by a collaboration between Google, ML6, Sarolea, and the Secret Service. Housed in a carbon fibre monocoque with Ohlins suspension and a carbon fibre swingarm, this streetfighter is at the ready with Dunlop Sportsmart TT tyres, and forged a luminum OZ Gass-R wheels.
In addition to the actual bike, Café Costume designed a tailored riding suit to compliment Sarolea’s killer engineering feat. The suit features advanced integrated protection when you’re on or off the bike, and comes as a package deal with a Hedon carbon fibre helmet from Milan, and a handmade Damascus steel knife. More than an electric motorbike, it’s a life choice. You’re commitment, should you choose to accept it, is $78,000. This package will be limited to 20 samples. ■

BY BILL VARETIMIDIS

For the full article grab the April 2020 issue of MAXIM Australia from newsagents and convenience locations. Subscribe here.

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